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Totally gutted and modded Da Vinci
#1
I bought a Da Vinci last November and since then I was struggling with the printer in general from the firmware to the extruder, everything. I have since replaced the main board with a Smoothieboard, added in a E3D Volcano, put in an aluminum slab on top of the heated bed, and much more! I just recently purchased a 2nd broken used Da Vinci on ebay and fixed it up with the same upgrades.

Under the plastic exterior of the Da Vinci is a very nice looking metal cube. I took all the plastic covers off and put on my own clear PETG plastic from mcmaster.com. I made custom hinged top and front door. The viewing angle with the top clear is so much nicer then the stock I recommend everyone do this. You can see so much easier whats happening inside. I also was able to make it much more air tight and almost no smell on even the smelliest filament will escape. Since I used 1/16" PETG it does not make the inside over heat. The extruder stepper stays under 70C max even after a 4 hour print. With all the stock plastic removed the whole printer is like 4 inches smaller on all sides, makes it much more compact. I was able to squeeze them both inside my small closet.

I ran LED light strips on the top also on all 4 sides. I need to replace them though because my old printers LED's have already faded out, I didn't even know LED's did that!
[Image: At2PoP.jpg]

[Image: 7yZUzU.jpg]

[Image: LkXEeN.jpg]

[Image: 9JX3xZ.jpg]

If anyone is interested here is some pics of my Smoothieboard and the wires going into it.
[Image: o4v7r6.jpg]
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#2
wow, very nice.

Would you like to show us how to to a smoothie conversion in detail. Does every stock part work on it, like endstops etc. ? The firmware and software you use...

Why no bowden conversion for more speed and less strain on the mechanics ?

Greetz
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#3
I plan to eventually print with flexible filaments so I don't care much to go to bowden. I've been printing at about 60mm/s which is good enough for me. Although I've never actually looked into a bowden setup. I noticed on my newest Da Vinci it has mounting holes for 2 stepper motors up on the frame you can tell its for a dual bowden setup for a future 2.0 or something which is interesting.

Another thing to note is the Smoothieboard is actually really smooth moving which is why its named that, all the motion is much more fluid feeling and appears to reduce the stress on the steppers. I've never had a single issue on the steppers themselves though in about 500 hours of printing. Most of that print time was with the stock board though, about 100 hours on the Smoothie I'd say.

I haven't found the E3D extruders to be as good as they are hyped up to be. I can't seem to go as fast as others claim before the drive gear starts shredding the filament. I've used lots of different kinds of filament and I'm using a MK8 drive gear on the stock da vinci stepper. Even at really high temperatures it just doesn't seem like enough heat. When I go up to the higher nozzles like 1.2mm I have to go ridiculously slow. Not sure what I'm doing wrong with them...

The Smoothieboard documentation is lacking info on how to setup the optical limit switches. I just replaced them with normal micro switches, super glued them in place.

I didn't bother trying to wire the stock PSU also I totally removed all that and put in a basic 12v 20amp power supply. I have it mounted high up on the back of the frame.
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#4
I'm curious, can you detail (maybe some pics) how you installed the E3D in the stock carriage?
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#5
Wow very interested in this! This is exactly what I have been planning to do with my printer. If you could do any kind of writeup for the smoothie board wiring I would appreciate it! Also, have you seen any print improvement from the smoothie board?
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#6
Nice lol Looks like my printers! I just bought a second one as well. It isn't totaly gutted though until you do what I have planned for mine. Full lead screw setup anyone? :lol: Any way looks good!

As for the e3d you may want to try a different feed setup... Mine used to strip badly as well then I went to my Neustruder setup I have now. If you don't want to go bowden then you may want to get your self a geared extruder motor and then use a larger diameter feeder gear.

I love my Volcano and the ability to print stuff so much faster. I have found though that any speeds above 36 mm/s are impossible with the volcano. I crank the heat to 240 C for my Inland ABS and print it at 30mm/s and it is still about a quarter of the time It would have taken with the standard e3d.
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#7
Latest printer I picked up was brand new and i got it for $100 and an old PS3 console lol .
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#8
was curious as how you got the bottom of the case off. I am able to take everything else apartment and I did take the screws out of the inside of the holes in the printer, but can't seem to find where it is still stuck to?
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#9
(03-01-2015, 08:15 AM)moo10032 Wrote: I bought a Da Vinci last November and since then I was struggling with the printer in general from the firmware to the extruder, everything. I have since replaced the main board with a Smoothieboard, added in a E3D Volcano, put in an aluminum slab on top of the heated bed, and much more! I just recently purchased a 2nd broken used Da Vinci on ebay and fixed it up with the same upgrades.

Under the plastic exterior of the Da Vinci is a very nice looking metal cube. I took all the plastic covers off and put on my own clear PETG plastic from mcmaster.com. I made custom hinged top and front door. The viewing angle with the top clear is so much nicer then the stock I recommend everyone do this. You can see so much easier whats happening inside. I also was able to make it much more air tight and almost no smell on even the smelliest filament will escape. Since I used 1/16" PETG it does not make the inside over heat. The extruder stepper stays under 70C max even after a 4 hour print. With all the stock plastic removed the whole printer is like 4 inches smaller on all sides, makes it much more compact. I was able to squeeze them both inside my small closet.

I ran LED light strips on the top also on all 4 sides. I need to replace them though because my old printers LED's have already faded out, I didn't even know LED's did that!
[Image: At2PoP.jpg]

[Image: 7yZUzU.jpg]

[Image: LkXEeN.jpg]

[Image: 9JX3xZ.jpg]

If anyone is interested here is some pics of my Smoothieboard and the wires going into it.
[Image: o4v7r6.jpg]

Hi, could you post your smoothieboard config please or send it via pm?

Thanks
Seb
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