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E3D v6 mod without carriage replacement
#1
I'm opening a new thread to discuss installing the E3D v6 on the Da Vinci 1.0 using the PLA thread but it's better to stop hijacking it and bring the discussions about this E3D mod here.

So, I'm currently half-way through the mod, with the hot-end installed in the carriage and all of the wiring ready. I just need to put it all back together and test it. I'll post pics when it's ready B)

Here are some issues and things I've encountered that deserve mentioning:

- Initially I had plans to attempt this mod but without actually raising the stepper motor, so losing about 2cm of build height instead. However it turned out impossible to install the E3D heat-sink with the fan on in the carriage in such position. There is just not enough space for the fan.
- Not written anywhere I think but you'll need 2 x 30mm M3 screws to attach the hot-end to the carriage. Actually 35mm might do better if you can find them (just add a washer or two if they end up being too long).
- To remove the X carriage, after unscrewing the rods, I had to basically remove entirely the left Y carriage, releasing it from its bushings, which were glued! It came off easy but I wasn't expecting this to be necessary, but I guess I'll it shouldn't be a big deal to glue them again with loctite.
- After attaching the hot-end with the 2 screws as well tightened as I could, I found that the lever that moves the idler was a too bit hard to move, as if it had too much friction with the printed parts. So I removed a bit of plastic from the lower piece where the two make contact and substituted it with a small washer, which fixed the problem. Actually I ended up putting 2 stacked washers in order to position the heat-sink in such a way that the PTFE tubing lined up perfectly with the idler wheel.
- The thermistor that comes with the E3D v6 will not work correctly with the thermistor table number 8 of the Repetier 0.92 firmware, it'll read something like 80ºC at ambient temp. According to this thread this is due to an extra resistor the davinci has in the breakout PCB, which is not accounted for in the thermistor table that comes with Repetier. Using the custom table #5 gives better readings, but still a bit off at ambient temps (27ºC instead of 22ºC), and I guess the deviation might be worse at high temperatures. I have yet to decide whether I go with this or try to re-utilize the stock thermistor.

Feel free to ask questions or discuss anything related to this mod in this thread Smile
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#2
BTW holding the stock carriage on my hand for the first time made me realize how heavy the stepper motor really is... now I kinda understand why people use Bowden setups Smile
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#3
I must be an anomaly with my e3d setup because I'm using the thermistor that came with it, didnt change squat as far as tables and my ambient temp on startup is 19. I'm on 1.0 with the jumper, wonder if board differences are causing the differences in experience.

I'm also one of the folks that need to jump start the bed because its slow to initialize. Maybe setting that in firmware is also buying me some wiggle room with the extruder thermistor?
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#4
If you turn the fan mount upside you still can't get it to fit? Granted I was all of 10 minutes of installing this In the original location before moving the stepper up, but I don't recall any issues in that area. I may have had to move the fan holder up or down a touch, but it wouldn't have been further than one of the e3d "fins".

Not trying to rub it in, but last night I successfully printed pla for 6 hrs @ .1 layer height. If I do have a hardware issue I'll gladly accept it as this was completely impossible for me on the stock setup.
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#5
Nice one! So do you still hear some clicking as you mentioned in other thread? I'm a bit concerned about the positioning of the E3D fan, partially blocked by the carriage, which is likely to worsen the airflow...
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#6
oscahie, I will still get some extruder gear kickback, its actually supposed to do that rather than cram filament down the nozzle when there is an issue. Its not nearly as severe as stock, and I have yet to swap out the cold end gears/assembly as I currently dont have any issues. All my problems are with edge curl making it difficult to push filament as Ill get one or two clicks and then it will clear up, not a single jam yet. I thought the same about the wonky position of the fan, but it seems the e3d's design alone lessens the need for a tornado blowing on it, like the davinci did. My cold end kickback has been exclusively due to the nozzle being too close to the bed or model.

Kieth pointed out a flaw in the cold end design and I agree 100%. I know Ill have to replace the drive mechanism at some point, but for now Im enjoying all the printing success!
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#7
So the printer is printing again! Smile First impressions are that the E3D hot-end extrudes better than the stock one, as in with finer traces or something. I've only done a few test prints of small objects with ABS so I don't have real conclusions yet. This weekend I'll have time to do many tests, also with PLA, and post some pics of the finished setup, which looks quite neat.

I did notice some heat issues though. Printing a small cube it came out with bulged corners, as was happening with the stock extruder too. With the stock however the bulged corners were almost invariantly the ones in the back, whereas with the E3D it was the ones on the left side of the cube, which makes me think that it has to be due to the fan blowing hot air in that direction. I have to try either reversing the fan or isolating the area with kapton tape so that the air goes up and not down towards the bed.

Other than that -and as Nephenty found out the hard way Tongue - I had to adjust the 'Y max length' in the EEPROM from 217 to 212 to avoid crashing into the front X rod. With 212 you still have 200mm of real build length on the Y axis and the stepper motor is just shy of touching the rod. Also it's no longer possible to crash into the Z endstop yay!

Question for Nephenty: what did you use to glue the bushings back to the left Y carriage? (I assume you had to).
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#8
I did see there was some type of blue glue used to hold the bushings in originally, but I don't think it held because the carriage came off easy. I haven't glued them back in yet in case I need to take it back off to replace the cold end. I have a mk7 built and ready, but also looking at bowden to see if there could be something tweaked to easily switch between the two.

To answer your question though, when it comes time I'll probably just use loctite super glue.
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#9
I owe some pictures to this thread! Sorry about that. I haven't had much time to print as of lately but when I do it's been almost always with PLA. I haven't heard a single 'click' ever since I installed the E3D, it just works Smile Really happy about it! Also I have some filament samples of bamboo, carbon fiber and copper that I'll be trying out soon.

I fixed some issues I had with printing ABS, basically too much heat on the first few layers and the whole thing would look like a mess. Turns out once I started using kapton tape in the bed, I could print just fine at 90ºC instead of 110 that I was doing before.

The only other recurring problem I have with this printer is the accuracy. Prints with hinges or moving parts that require very good dimensional accuracy often end up fused together. I tried and failed twice at printing the famouse NASA wrench... Sad I might need to print slower than 20mm/s...

The last improvement I have done is a proper spool holder with ball bearings, which has a lot less drag than what I was using. I think that should have an effect in print quality and accuracy too, since tension in the filament could in theory offset the nozzle a bit.

So here are a few pics of my setup:

[img]
This is how I chose to attach the breakboard PCB. I just wanted to have it out of the way.

[img]
And here is everything in place. Please disregard the sloppy kapton tape in the cooling fan, I have yet to make a proper thing to hold it in place.
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#10
I've modded a bit the original design for a more sturdy assembly. Not that the original is bad, but it's always felt to me like the hot-end could be more robustly attached to the carriage. This is how it looks now:

[img]

The additional spacer is also a modification of the spacer included with the v2 of this mod by its original author (http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:680959).
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#11
What version of the e3d head is needed for this mod? Is it the bowden one or direct drive and what size filament?
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#12
This is the E3D v6 1.75mm universal in direct drive configuration: http://e3d-online.com/E3D-v6/Full-Kit/v6...-Universal
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#13
Have you posted the model for this anywhere? I can't find it on thingiverse. I'd love to use this as a starting point for a hexagon hotend.
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#14
I was planning to upload it to thingiverse, but I have yet to do some minor editing in the model as the upper right part needed to be filed a little to fit correctly (you can notice this in the picture of it installed). However I used the original author's STL files as starting point, and just later realized that the had actually posted the SketchUp files for his v2 of the mod, which would be easier to use as base if you want to do heavy modifications. Anyway, I'll be posting my skp files too.
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#15
Looks good! Have you seen the newer version with the filament guide by the same author? Im currently using that and have been successfully printing ninjaflex since the upgrade. I removed the pfte tubing from the e3d and replaced with a longer piece, and its very close to touching the bottom of the gears. Havent had a jam yet.

I think the filament is more likely to buckle between the bottom of the gears and the nozzle than the top, but it does guide the filament now, versus having to reach around the back and guide it through the gears.
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#16
Thank you! Yes, I have seen that, but as some other guy mentioned in the thingiverse comments, it actually offers no improvement over version 1 (or over my version for that matter) for handling flexible filaments. The filament guide he added is equivalent to the short PTFE tubing that I have on mine, and its only function is to facilitate the loading of filament. For flexible filaments you need the PTFE tubing coming out of the hot-end to be as close as possible to the gear, which is what you seem to have done. An inverted 'V' cut should work well. I should so that soon too, but haven't bought any flexible filament yet Smile
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#17
yeah, i dont have much use for ninjaflex myself aside from vibration dampers. Its not something im supposed to be able to pull off with this printer, so thats why Im drawn to it. Wink
I just noticed you are using a different extruder fan, did the author tweak that for ya to accommodate the raised stepper? Mind sharing if you tweaked it to work, yourself?
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#18
The fan is a work in progress, too. I imported the original STL file in SketchUp and removed the clip that attaches it to the stepper in the original position. Then I was supposed to figure out some new way to attach it, but my modeling skills leave a lot to be desired and I haven't really spent much time with it, so for now I'm just holding it with kapton tape Smile If you want the model without the clip I can upload it here. Or you can also print it whole and then remove manually the bits of plastic that are on the way.
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#19
I've completed the final tweaks and added the remix to thingiverse: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:707530
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#20
Oscahie,

Fortunately the original model (fan) imported into sketchup as a solid. I detached the stepper clip, moved it up 18.3mm and reattached after adding some additional bulk to stabilize the new clip position. I can upload this evening if interested. I started the print this morning before leaving to work, so Ill make sure it fits w/o modification before posting my remix.
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